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More information on Giclee Art Prints

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Everything you wanted to know about E8 Giclee Art Prints

All prints are made from Scalar Vector Graphics (.SVG) formatted export files from the Mathematica coded graphics engine by the author. This means they produce maximum resolution when printed at ANY scale.

Definition of Giclee'

Giclée (pron.: /ʒiːˈkleɪ/ zhee-KLAY or /dʒiːˈkleɪ/), is a neologism coined in 1991 by printmaker Jack Duganne for fine art digital prints made on inkjet printers. The name originally applied to fine art prints created on IRIS printers in a process invented in the late 1980s but has since come to mean any inkjet print. It is often used by artists, galleries, and print shops to denote high quality printing but since it is an unregulated word it has no associated warranty of quality.

Current usage

Beside its original association with IRIS prints, the word giclée has come to be associated with other types of inkjet printing including processes that use fade-resistant, archival inks (pigment-based, as well as newer solvent-based inks), and archival substrates primarily produced on Epson, HP and other large-format printers.These printers use the CMYK color process but may have multiple cartridges for variations of each color based on the CcMmYK color model (such as light magenta and light cyan inks in addition to regular magenta and cyan); this increases the apparent resolution and color gamut and allows smoother gradient transitions.[6] A wide variety of substrates is available, including various textures and finishes such as matte photo paper, watercolor paper, cotton canvas, or artist textured vinyl.

What type of ink do you use?

We use aqueous pigmented inks rated at 200 years.

We don't use solvent inks for they emit harmful VOC (volatile organic compounds) into the air that may be harmful to your health.

Dye vs pigment

Dye inks can, in theory, produce more colors than pigment inks. The drawback is stability. Within a few months, dye images start to degrade. If a dye image is displayed in a sunny room, changes can be visible in only 2 - 3 months. Dye prints may fade irreparably in just one year. In the past, many companies expected their dye inks to last 25 years. Experience proved them all wrong. Pigments by nature are far more resistant to degradation. Pigments have been used in paintings since mankind’s earliest cave art 40,000 years ago; they are the reason we can still see and enjoy them today!

What type of printer do you use?

We use Epson and Canon printers which are pretty much the standard for printing giclées.

What type of coating do you use on the canvas?

We use Epson and Canon printers which are pretty much the standard for printing giclées.

We offer only one coating surface which is somewhere between gloss and semi-gloss. In our opinion it is the surface that offers the best saturation and contrast but without the drawbacks of high gloss. It is enhanced UV, water and abrasion resistant. We use a machine to coat the canvas. Spray and rollers do not do a really good job, and you can not coat a few hundred giclées in one day using these methods.

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