All posts by jgmoxness

Comparing nearest edges between Split Real Even (SRE) E8

I have been intrigued with Richter’s arXiv 0704.3091 “Triacontagonal Coordinates for the E8 root system” paper.

Comparing nearest edges between Split Real Even (SRE) E8 and Richter’s Complex 4D Golden Ratio Petrie Projection Model:

Please note, the vertex numbers are reordered from Richter’s paper in order to be consistent with ArXiv quant-ph 1502.04350 “Parity Proofs of Kochen-Specker theorem based on the Lie Algebra E8” by Aravind and Waegell. This paper uses the beautiful symmetries of E8 as a basis for proof sets related to the Bell inequalities of quantum mechanics. Below is a graphic showing that vertex number ordering:

Richter’s model with 74 nearest edges per vertex (Complex 4D Norm’d length Sqrt[2], with 8880 total):

Richter’s model with only 26 nearest edges per vertex (Complex 4D Norm’d length 1, 3120 total):

The above unity length edge pattern has is more consistent with the SRE E8 below.

The SRE E8 Petrie Projection (with 56 Norm’d edge length Sqrt[2] for each vertex, 6720 total). This is equivalent to folding E8 to H4 with an 8×8 rotation matrix which creates a 4D-left H4+H4*Phi and a 4D-right H4+H4*Phi.

Please note, the vertex number is that of the E8 vertices rotated (or “folded”) to H4 in 2D Petrie projection. The vertex numbers are in canonical binary order from E8’s 1:1 correspondence with the 9th row of the Pascal Triangle (eliminating the 16 generator/anti-generator vertices of E8 found in the 2nd and 8th column of the Pascal Triangle). The graphic below shows the vertex number ordering:

Here we take the 4D-left half and project to two concentric rings of H4 and H4 Phi (Golden Ratio) with 56 nearest edges per vertex (Norm’d length of unity or Phi for each vertex):

The animation frames are sorted by the ArcTan[y/x] of the vertex position in each ring (sorted H4*Phi outer to inner, then H4 outer to inner).

The work of Frans G. Marcelis

 

https://fgmarcelis.wordpress.com

http://members.home.nl/fg.marcelis/

Really cool analysis of E8 geometry. I would love to collaborate, but can’t seem to find any contact info. If anyone knows him or can contact him, let me know.

I found his ’79-’81 Masters Thesis “Collectieve beweging in atoomkernen” from tue.nl

He co-authored a paper B. J. Verhaar, J. de Kam, A. M. Schulte, F. Marcelis: Simplified description of y vibrations in permanently deformed nuclei. Phys. Rev. C18 (1978) 523.

and see he participated in the HISPARC collaboration.

 

Some of my work that may support his is shown in this post, which shows how there are 10 self dual 24 cells in 2 sets of 5 (one for each H4 600 cell within E8). These are broken down by dual 16 vertex 8-cells and 8 vertex 16 cells. Marcelis creates a set of 14 8-cells (224 vertices) plus a basis of 16 vertices.

snub-pics

I replicate some of his work below using my Mathematica demonstration code as a base. When clicking a given vertex in my tool, it generates the edges to the 56 nearest vertices to that clicked vertex (as measured in all 8 dimensions). These are indeed the same vertices as those that intersect the rings of E8 Petrie Projection after translation to the clicked point.

Ring intersections that complement the 240 E8 vertices from 3{3}3{4}2. This is like clicking every 5th vertex (6) on the inner ring of E8 Petrie Projection.

Vertices from 3{3}3{4}2

Inner 3{4}3

6 Outer 3{3}3

Updated My ToE Demonstrations to Wolfram Language (aka. Mathematica) 11

Please see the latest in .nb, .cdf demonstrations files and web interactive pages.

ToE_Demonstration-Lite.cdf Latest: 08/15/2016 (10 Mb). This is a lite version of the full Mathematica version 11 demonstration in .CDF below (or as an interactive-Lite web page) (4 Mb). It only loads the first 8 panes and the last UI pane which doesn’t require the larger file and load times. It requires the free Mathematica CDF plugin.

This version of the ToE_Demonstration-Lite.nb (13 Mb) is the same as CDF except it includes file I/O capability not available in the free CDF player. This requires a full Mathematica license.

ToE_Demonstration.cdf Latest: 08/15/2016 (110 Mb). This is a Mathematica version 11 demonstration in .CDF (or as an interactive web page) (130 Mb) takes you on an integrated visual journey from the abstract elements of hyper-dimensional geometry, algebra, particle and nuclear physics, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in Chaos Theory and Fractals, quantum relativistic cosmological N-Body simulations, and on to the atomic elements of chemistry (visualized as a 4D periodic table arranged by quantum numbers). It requires the free Mathematica CDF plugin.

This version of the ToE_Demonstration.nb (140 Mb) is the same as CDF except it includes file I/O capability not available in the free CDF player. This requires a full Mathematica license.

(The CDF player from Wolfram.com is still at v. 10.4.1, so still exhibits the bug I discovered related to clipping planes/slicing of 3D models).

Hofstadter’s Quantum-Mechanical Butterfly

Hofstadter’s Quantum-Mechanical Butterfly relates to the fractional Quantum Hall Effect, which is (IMHO) at the heart of understanding (interpreting) how QM really works!

I modified Wolfram Demonstration code by Enrique Zeleny to produce a short video of the emergence of the Hofstadter’s Quantum-Mechanical Butterfly

I found an interesting pattern. By modifying the integer used in the solution i=12, the Golden Ratio Ф=(1+Sqrt[5])/2=1.618 … emerges within the butterfly! Can you find it (or 1/Ф=.618…)?
Hint: Use the interactive version and mouse-over the red or green dots in the white space of the wings of butterfly.

A snapshot of the code and last frame@n=50:
HofstadterButterfly

If you have the free Mathematica CDF plugin on a non-Chrome browser, you can interactively analyze this with n<11 being presented with symbolic solutions in a mouse-over Tooltip (below).

Visualizing Climate Data

I saw this post on the Wolfram blog.

I’ve enhanced the code to show some error bar indicators and visualized by year w/o the obfuscation of accumulation over time. It also uses parallel CPUs and binary packed arrays to speed up the computation. I also reduced the scale from +2.5C to +1C (since there was no data above it). I wonder if that anomalously larger scale was selected to “suggest” a placeholder for future warming (not appropriate as science – but typical for “influencing” public opinion).

I think my presentation more accurately shows that the recent data from the ’00s (with several El Nino’s), mid 40-60’s ocean temp bias adjustment increases, and more recent changes in (space) technology for collecting data may be a (the?) significant root cause for increases in temperature.

That may not be a politically correct thing to suggest – but I will do more work to substantiate based on the statistical analysis of the various data sets….

If you don’t have the Wolfram CDF Player on a non-Chrome browser for interactive UI, you can watch the YouTube video here or see below.

warming1

warming-1g

Interactive Reimann Zeta Function Zeros Demonstration

This web enabled demonstration shows a polar plot of the first 20 non-trivial Riemann zeta function zeros (including Gram points) along the critical line Zeta(1/2+it) for real values of t running from 0 to 50. The consecutively labeled zeros have 50 red plot points between each, with zeros identified by concentric magenta rings scaled to show the relative distance between their values of t. Gram’s law states that the curve usually crosses the real axis once between zeros.

A downloadable copy is available ZetaZeros-local-art-50.cdf Latest: 05/23/2016.

Note: The interactive CDF plug-in as required below does not currently work on Chrome browsers.

A Snapshot picture for those w/o Wolfram CDF interactivity:
RiemannZeta_Zeros.svg

Selectable example code snippet:
[wlcode]Show[ListPlot[Style[pts2, Red], PlotRange -> {{-2, 4}, {-3, 3}},
AspectRatio -> 1, ImageSize -> imageSize,
AxesStyle ->
Directive[Thick, If[artPrint && ! localize, Large, Medium]],
Graphics[{PointSize@.01,
tttxt := If[artPrint && ! localize, tttxt1, ttxt0];
If[ttxt0 = ToString[# – 1];
Abs@zeroY[[#, 1]] < 10 chop, (* Magenta Critical Line Zeta Zeros *) tttxt1 = Column[{ToString[# - 1], "t=" <> ToString@zeroY[[#, 4]]},
Center];
ttLoc =
zeroY[[#, 4]] If[artPrint && ! localize, 1, 2] imagesize/40000;
(* Flip Point Labels above/below the X axis *)
ttLoc1 = {-1, (-1)^Round[#/2]} ttLoc/Sqrt[2];
{Magenta, Point@ttLoc1,
Circle[zeroY[[#, ;; 2]], ttLoc, {1, 3} \[Pi]/2],
Black,
Tooltip[Text[
Style[tttxt, If[artPrint && ! localize, Large, Medium, Bold]],
(* Shift the Labels off the Point *)
ttLoc1 (1 – (-1)^Round[#/2] .05)], tttxt1]},
(* Orange Critical Line Imaginary zeros w/Real>0 *)
tttxt1 =
Column[{ToString[# – 1], “x=” <> ToString@zeroY[[#, 1]],
“t=” <> ToString@zeroY[[#, 4]]}, Center];
{Tooltip[{Orange, Point@zeroY[[#, ;; 2]], Text[Style[

Column[If[EvenQ[Round[(# – 1)/2]], Prepend,
Append][{“\[UpDownArrow]”}, tttxt], Center,
Frame -> True],
Black, If[artPrint && ! localize, Large, Medium],
Background -> White],
(* Flip Point Labels above/below the X axis *)

zeroY[[#, ;; 2]] + {0, (-1)^Round[(# – 1)/2]} If[
artPrint && ! localize, 1,
If[artPrint, 4/1, 3]] imagesize/5000]},
Column[{ToString[# – 1], “x=” <> ToString@zeroY[[#, 1]],
“t=” <> ToString@zeroY[[#, 4]]}, Center]]}] & /@
Range@Length@zeroY,
Magenta, Disk[{0, 0}, .03]}]][/wlcode]

More plots with various scaling functions and multi-color coding along with Tooltip on mouse-over. Bear in mind the last Smith Chart with a division by Abs@Zeta indicates where the increments go exponential near the 0.

A Snapshot picture for those w/o Wolfram CDF interactivity:
ZetaZeros